Our Top 6 Ubud Cafes for Remote Working


With one of us writing a thesis for a master’s degree, the other freelancing, (and both of us having no clue what we’re doing with our lives), cafe hopping to find the best place to study was a daily occurrence for us. To save you some time we’ve listed (in no particualr order) our top 6 cafes for remote working during our time in Ubud, as well as their pros and cons. You can thank us later.

#1 Sayuri

A popular spot, and what felt like the watering hole for Ubud’s entire hipster community. Foodwise, it’s plant based galore here with smoothies, cakes, bowls, salads and hot dishes to choose from.

Pros:

Wifi:
Yes, yes. We’re a slave to technology but for both of our work, we needed reliable and strong wifi and Sayuri provided on this front.

Seating:
You’re spoilt for choice when it comes to this one. There’s indoor and outdoor seating, easily with a capacity of X people. For the people who feel that sitting on a chair is a thing of the past, then there’s plenty of beanbags for you to choose from too.

Power Outlets:
Possessing a 3-year-old, second-hand laptop with a bad battery life means we’re always in dire need of power outlets. Sayuri has tonnes available.

Menu:
Cakes are the best motivator when you’re working, and Sayuri has a huge selection to choose from (we’d recommend the banana cake). And there’s more. The menu is an extensive one, and exclusively plant-based, so you’re covered meal-wise. You can check it out for yourself here.

Cons:

Pricey:
We’re talking relatively here. Sayuri is still cheap compared to the amount of money we’d be paying back in Europe, but for cafes based in Ubud – it’s on the more expensive side. On a couple of occasions, we also got stung by some hidden costs too; paying by card added extra money to the bill, and some of the drinks we bought turned about to be more expensive than what was stated on the menu.

Events:
Japanese conversational workshops, stand-up improv, live music and movie nights are just some of the examples on Sayuri’s social calendar. Don’t get us wrong, some of these events are things we’d be interested in, but, if you’re hoping to work or study, then the noise could be a distraction. That’s the situation we found ourselves in – happily working away, but then needing to leave when the live music band took to the stage.

The Crowd

We’ve mentioned some of the things we didn’t like about Ubud before, one of which being the culturally insensitive demographic that the island attracts. Well, that’s (to an extent) the crowd that Sayuri attracts. And sometimes we would overhear a mixture of obnoxious and culturally appropriated conversations, that would send us both into a simultaneous eye roll.

#2 Warung Green

Primarily a buffet restaurant (and one of our favourites) Warung Green makes for a great study spot too.

Pros:

Price:
You’ve got a deadline approaching or just mountain of work to get through – and if you’re anything like us, this means that coffee on tap is needed. Here, a cup will cost you 5k. We’d often order the 15k ice-cream too: perfect motivator.

Menu:
It’s a self-service buffet which means you’re covered for a cheap plant-based lunch with a lot to choose from – saves you bringing a packed lunch or having to migrate somewhere else to eat.

Cons:

Location:
This is a double whammy. Depending on where you’re based in Ubud, Warung Green could be a bit of journey for you (for us, it was around a 25 minute walk). Unfortunately, it’s also located right next to a busy road, so if you’ve got a Zoom call scheduled then be prepared for lots of background noise (as Sara can testify).

Toilet:
After all that 5k coffee you’ll be drinking, nature will call. And unfortunately, you’ll have to head outside of the restaurant and round the back to use the toilet.

Seating:
The homey feel of Warung Green is great if you’re just there for the vegan buffet, but can be an added complication if you’re looking to spend the day working from a laptop. Given its limited seating, we’d suggest getting there early to snag yourself a spot.

#3 Bali Buda

This place is an organic cafe, restaurant, and mini-food store all rolled into one with branches across Bali. And how can we fault this place? It has everything you need for a solid study session (we think you can guess what our favourite spot is..)

Pros:

Wifi:
Yes, we keep going on about wifi, but it can be notoriously difficult to find a place with decent wifi in Ubud (and the rest of Bali). Patchy service is never an issue here.

Seating:
Bali Buda struck the perfect balance for us – more seating than Opini Kopi, but less than Sayuri. It meant for minimal background noise and no self-righteous conversations that we can’t help but overhear.

Chain:
A double-edged sword. The fact that Bali Buda is a humble chain makes it a dependable choice – you know what to expect on the menu, that the wifi will be decent and that there’s not going to be a Hunger Games-like scramble for a seat.

Cinnamon Roll:
We’re only half joking.
Try one when you’re here – you won’t regret it (we know, we’ve had about six in the time that we were in Ubud).

Cons:

Chain:
We’re scraping the barrel here. The fact that Bali Buda is a chain could be an issue for those looking to support the up-and-coming independent establishments, then it could be.

#4 Ary’s Book Cafe

What beats books and coffee? Exactly. We can’t think of anything better either. Bring your laptop in the knowledge that there’re books nearby ready to be opened if you fancy procrastinating from whatever work you should be doing.

Pros:

Location:
Ary’s is a one-minute walk from Ubud Palace and a two-minute walk from Saraswati Temple which makes for a great break from work. When we needed some time away from our screen, we’d take ourselves to one of these places for a quick walk around. You’re not far from the Ubud Art Market, either.

Independent:
Part of the charm of Ubud is its array of independent cafes and, let’s be honest, we should all do a little bit to help independent establishments, especially in light of the pandemic.

Price:
A cup of coffee was in the low 20k’s here, and the other hot beverages were also cheaper than what we’d antcipated given its central location. We’re the type of people who like making the most of our money (going so far as to challenge oursleves to see how much we can do with 5 euros) – so this affordability was a real perk for us.

Seating:
You’ve got lots to choose from here – inside or outside. There’s also decent-sized tables which means you can do what Sara usually does ie. occupy one that is easily made for 6 people, proceed to cover every surface inch with papers, and then complain that you don’t have enough space.

Cons:

Opening Times:
Why do you do this to us Ary? The perfect study spot with good, cheap coffee, and plenty of seating.. but it opens at 3:00 pm, which coincides perfectly with our productivity slump.

#5 Atman Coffee

Flop down onto one of the huge cushioned benches, and get a locally sourced coffee in your system. It’s hard to feel overwhelmed by a mountainous workload when you’re somewhere as chilled as Atman.

Pros:

Atmosphere:
If we’re judging on atmosphere alone, then Atman would’ve easily been our favourite. The whole ‘vibe’ of the place (a word that we hope never to hear again and one that’s over-exhausted here in Bali), is perfect for studying. The music; the lighting; the spaciousness – all make for a great study spot.

Seating:
You won’t be hard-pressed to find a seat and there’s floor seating too if that’s what you prefer (please tell us how to gracefully get back on your feet – at the moment, we’re having to pull each other up). Handily, there’s always a power outlet nearby as well.

Wifi:
There are a couple of Atman’s scattered around Ubud. We went for the branch on Hanoman street and never had any issues with wifi while we were there.

Cons:

Price:
Atman is like Sayuri in this respect and, again, we’re speaking relatively here. Out of all the cafes we visited Atman was easily one of the more expensive places. A long black coffee would cost 27k (not including tax) and could be finished in two gulps.

#6 Opini Kopi

A fifteen-minute walk away from the centre of Ubud town and you’re saying goodbye to the constant rumble of motorbikes and horn honking. Now, substitute that for a quiet spot near some paddy fields and you’re in for a treat.

Pros:

Price:
We’ve made it pretty clear how we keep an eye on what we’re spending (thank you student debt, tax increases and increased living costs!). So the affordable price tags for beverages and food here made Opini Kopi a hit for us.

Independent:
Another independent spot and Indonesian-owned. Knowing that the money we do spend goes straight into the back pocket of a local makes for better spending.

Free Drink:
Yes, you read that right. Just write a Google review and then you’ll be rewarded with a free drink. (Sara went for the hazelnut coffee, while Ellie went for a bog-standard long black).

Cons:

Menu:
As we are vegans, this was more of a personal con. For anyone who isn’t, this won’t be a con for you. For us, it meant that we had less to choose from. Anyway, we recommend their cracking smoothie bowl, which was Ellie’s demise when we did our five-euro challenge.

Seating:
Compared to the likes of Sayuri and Atman, there’s considerably less seating here. True, it makes for a more quiet work environment. But that’s not much use if you arrive to find that all the seats have been taken.

Final Thoughts

Well, we tried to stay impartial but our favourite out of the six (in case you didn’t guess) is Bali Buda. If you disagree with us or have any recommendations, feel free to send them our way! We’d love to try them next time we’re in Ubud.

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